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Over the last several years there have been a number of exciting breakthroughs and advancements in the diagnosis, treatment and care of oncology patients. Depending on which information you read there are about 1800 “oncology” compounds in various places with the drug development pipeline. It is expected that there will be a relatively large explosion of molecules coming to market over the next decade. When combined with the expected dynamic where Primary Care Physicians will be more involved with the management of Oncology patients, the industry will be requiring the redeployment of representatives into the oncology milieu.

This program and McGill University Oncology II are required to receive Oncology certification from CCPE. Please click here to go to the Oncology II page. You can choose to register for both McGill University Oncology I & II at the same time, however McGill University Oncology I is a prerequisite to II.

This course represents a departure from the standard CCPE paper based courses in a number of ways including:
  • The course is administered entirely on-line. Course content and exams are all delivered by the CCPE Learning Management System. (Previous CCPE students will recognize use of the LMS from taking their online exams.)
  • There is an exam for each module. That way you can learn the relevant material, take the exam and move onto the next module: reducing the amount of material required to study and less pressure than having one “Big Exam” at the end of the course.
  • Completing the program requires students to complete all module exams on-line where results from each module exam will contribute to the overall course grade.
  • Students will need to successfully complete both Oncology I and Oncology II to be certified in Oncology. (the completion of both programs is required for CCPE awards and medals)
  • Physicians, allied healthcare workers and McGill University Medical Students, interns and residents are taking this course. You will learn what they are learning!
Oncology
Product Details

Course Name
McGill University Oncology I

Category
Body Systems and Therapeutic Areas

Package
9 modules E-Learning on MyCCPE portal
Suggested number of hours of study: 60
Timeline: 6 months to complete the entire course

NOTE: Click on the headers below to expand

Module 1: Introduction to cancer

Reviews basic concepts in oncology, the pathophysiology of cancer, its detection, diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Define cancer and explain the difference between benign and malignant tumors.
  2. Differentiate between carcinomas, sarcomas, leukemias and lymphomas.
  3. List the early warning signs of cancer.
  4. List potential uses for tumor markers.
  5. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of cancer screening in the cancer prevention process.
  6. Describe the role of various cancer treatments.

Module 2: Breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy found in women and the second most common cause of death from cancer in developed countries. This module will discuss the different types of breast cancer, the risk factors associated with the disease, the signs and symptoms, as well as the prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. Finally, this module will discuss various screening and prevention methods. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Identify the major types of breast cancer.
  2. Describe the risk factors, signs and symptoms of breast cancer.
  3. Describe the prognosis and treatments of breast cancer.
  4. Describe methods that can be used to screen for and prevent breast cancer.

Module 3: Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for both men and women, and is the only cancer with a clear preventable etiology. This module discusses the modern advances in the prevention of lung cancer, the pathology of the disease, as well as the diagnosis of lung cancer, its prognosis and treatment. After reading this module you should be able to:
  1. Describe the risks of smoking and the importance of primary prevention of lung cancer.
  2. Describe the importance of smoking cessation.
  3. Describe the current status of screening.
  4. Describe the signs and symptoms of lung cancer.
  5. Describe the methods involved in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer, and its prognosis and treatments.

Module 4: Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in Canada and the second most frequent cause of cancer death. In this module, we examine the risk factors, prevention, screening, and classification, as well as therapy for metastatic cancer, which are applicable to both colon cancer and rectal cancer; hence the term colorectal cancer. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Describe the risk factors for developing colorectal cancer.
  2. Describe the screening tests for colorectal cancer.
  3. Describe the staging and prognosis for colorectal cancer.
  4. Describe the treatment and follow up for colorectal cancer.

Module 5: Head and Neck cancer

Head and neck cancer refers to a group of 7 malignancies originating in the upper aerodigestive tract. This module will not discuss thyroid or salivary gland malignancies. It will cover the different types of head and neck cancer, risk factors associated with the disease, signs and symptoms, and prognosis, treatment, screening and prevention. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Identify the major types of head and neck cancer.
  2. Describe the risk factors for the development of head and neck cancer.
  3. Describe the signs and symptoms of head and neck cancer.
  4. Describe the treatment of head and neck cancer.
  5. Describe the screening and prevention of head and neck cancer.

Module 6: Lymphoma and Myeloma

Lymphoma, myeloma and leukemia are tumors of hematopoietic tissue. The two main types of lymphomas are Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hodgkin's lymphoma is a relatively uncommon diagnosis. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is the fifth most common cancer diagnosis among Canadian men and women. The clinical severity/significance of myeloma is very variable, and ranges from a benign increased production/presence of a specific immunoglobulin subtype to a full blown multiple myeloma. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Describe the characteristics of myeloma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  2. Describe methods that can be used to detect myeloma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  3. Describe the prognosis and treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  4. Describe the goals of myeloma therapy.

Module 7: Treatment of cancer

In this module, we begin with a discussion of the process of cancer drug development. This information will help in the interpretation of clinical outcomes of cancer clinical trials. Also discussed, are standardized tools used to assess toxicity and quality of life in patients receiving cancer therapies. Conventional antineoplastic drugs, hormonal and immune responses for cancer, and the major side effects of these therapies will be discussed as well. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Explain the three steps of a new antineoplastic therapy.
  2. Compare and contrast the four clinical phases of cancer drug development.
  3. Discuss comparative measures of response, survival, toxicity and quality of life that may be used in cancer treatment trials.
  4. Explain the importance of pharmacoeconomics in cancer treatment decisions.
  5. Explain different cancer therapy methods.

Module 8: Leukemia

Leukemia is characterized primarily but not exclusively by changes in the peripheral blood cells. In leukemia, neoplastic cells are present in the marrow and peripheral blood, and may also be present in the lymph nodes and other tissues. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Describe the characteristics of acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
  2. Describe their signs and symptoms.
  3. Describe their diagnosis and treatments methods.

Module 9: Palliative care

Palliative care is an approach that provides physical, psychosocial and spiritual care to patients and their families who are facing a life threatening illness. In this module, we discuss the philosophy of palliative care and the dying process, types of pain associated with cancer and agents used to provide symptomatic relief. We also discuss some common physical discomforts experienced by palliative care patients and the recommended treatments. After reading this module, you should be able to:
  1. Describe the philosophy of palliative care.
  2. Describe how pain is perceived.
  3. Describe the characteristics of acute and chronic cancer-related pain.
  4. Identify drugs used for treatment of nociceptive and neuropathic pain in patients with cancer.
  5. Describe the agents used for symptomatic relief of physical symptoms that may accompany cancer.

C.E. Units
6 credits (What is this?)

Key Objectives
After completing the course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the epidemiology, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of various types of cancer
  • Discuss the palliative treatment of oncology patients
Registration

Register for this course using our secured online registration form

Price:
$1,238.00
Corporate Members: $619.00
Corporate Non-Members: $3,095.00

Information
For credit card payment process, shipping costs and return policy click here

Exam Details

Type of Exam
Multiple Choice

Number of questions
9 individual module exams (totaling 99 multiple-choice questions)

Time Limit
Based on individual modules (10 minutes to 30 minutes per module)
6 months to complete the entire course

Passing Grade
55%

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